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The Impact of People Operations on Employee Lifetime Value

Jessica Pfisterer

Jessica Pfisterer’s role at Greenhouse is managing systems and perks, benefits, and compensation. Before joining Greenhouse as Director of People Operations in July 2015, Jessica built out the People Operations function at MuleSoft during three years of global hyper-growth. Jessica is an avid dancer and recovering attorney.

The People Operations team at Greenhouse is responsible for Total Rewards (compensation, benefits, and perks), employee-facing systems and operations, HR programs, and compliance. The employee is our customer, and we work to make it easy to be a Greenhouse employee. We work closely with other internal service organizations, like the Talent Management, Employee Experience (EX), and IT teams.  

In this post, I’m going to talk about Total Rewards and their impact on Employee Lifetime Value (ELTV).  

  • I’ll start with a quick overview of the concept of ELTV

  • I’ll define each piece of Greenhouse’s Total Rewards package and its impact on ELTV

  • I’ll give you tips on designing your own Total Rewards package

  • I’ll provide insight on how we measure success and communicate our programs

Read on to learn more!

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Finding the "Organizational Fit": 3 Ways Successful Companies Get It Right

Marias Headshot

Maria Christopoulos Katris is the Co-Founder & CEO of Built In, the most powerful online recruiting solution for tech companies across six U.S. markets. The network of Built In sites provides an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at the innovative products and cultures of today's top tech companies. Maria’s team shares insights on recruiting and employer branding in the tech space on Built In’s Tech Recruiter Blog.

Everyone in the recruiting space understands the importance of finding the “organizational fit,” (otherwise known as hiring for “cultural fit” or “culture add”). Employees that believe in and reflect an organization’s culture are more likely to report high job satisfaction, produce superior work, and remain with the company long term.  

But finding candidates that mesh with your company culture, selling them on your company, and assessing applicant fit beyond technical considerations is easier said than done. Over the past six years, we’ve helped thousands of startups and tech companies find, connect with, and hire top talent, and in that time we’ve seen firsthand how the most successful companies approach this challenge.

There are three ways that successful companies focus on finding the organizational fit. Keep reading to learn what they are and how you can make them part of your approach to hiring.

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How to Improve Employee Lifetime Value Through Employee Experience

Melanie Oberman

Melanie Oberman is the Director of Employee Experience at Greenhouse. She has a passion for making people and culture a strategic driver of the business, allowing employees to do the best work of their career. Her team focuses on scaling the culture in addition to day-to-day operations, office management, talent management, internal communication, and collaboration. We work to make it easy and fun for every employee to fully contribute and engage in the Greenhouse community.


And, she’s proud to say it's working—we were named #1 Best Place to Work by Glassdoor.


Before Greenhouse, Melanie advised senior executives at a variety of media, tech, and telecommunications companies on diversity & inclusion, communication, talent, and training strategies.


You can find Melanie on Twitter and LinkedIn.

It’s no secret that investing in a great employee experience (which I’ll abbreviate throughout this post as “EX”) can lead to highly engaged employees. At Greenhouse, we think engagement is measured in each person’s connection, motivation, and commitment to their company.  Our challenge is to build and run effective employee programs AND show the return on that investment.

The data backs us up: Employees who find meaning from their work are more than three times as likely to stay with their organizations. Employees who have meaning don’t just stay longer, they also report higher job satisfaction. So, it’s something we focus a lot of attention on. And it seems to be working.

In this post, I'll cover:

  • A quick refresher on ELTV

  • How our Employee Experience (EX) team designs our employee experience to drive engagement

  • How you can start to design and measure employee experience, too!
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How You Can Create a More Diverse and Inclusive Workplace

Casey Headshot

Casey Marshall is the Marketing Campaign Manager at Greenhouse. She teams up with Greenhouse partners and customers to tell a story and share insights into ways companies can improve their recruiting. She loves that this job allows her to build relationships with thought leaders and showcase how innovative companies are changing their recruiting approach. Connect with Casey on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Creating a more diverse and inclusive workplace is something that many companies are trying to prioritize. While most companies want to be more diverse, they can struggle with outlining a clear strategy. How do companies figure out a plan that sets a strong foundation and moves the needle towards improving diversity and inclusion (D&I)?

In our latest Hiring Hacks webinar, Greenhouse’s Director of Employee Experience, Melanie Oberman teamed up with 2020Shift’s CEO, Ariel Lopez to discuss the value of D&I, strategies for companies to get started, and tips towards building a more diverse and inclusive workplace.

Keep reading to learn what we discussed in the webinar!

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Featured Image Company Culture

A New Kind of Onboarding for a New Kind of People Team

Sydney Goodfellow Hazel

Sydney Goodfellow is the Marketing Manager at Hazel, a Greenhouse partner company that makes modern HRIS, time off, and employee engagement software for culture-centric companies. Hazel recently published an ebook called The Practical Guide to Scaling Company Culture, which you can read and download at hazelhq.com/blog.

One of my first jobs was working at a marina. My coworkers and I were responsible for cleaning up the boathouse to get it ready for members and students. It was a gruellng kind of orientation. We spent weeks cleaning, building, lifting, and fixing for long hours every day. What’s more, it poured rain almost the entire time. We donned foul-weather gear, ran inside when it thundered, and dried our hats on the heaters during lunch.

And yet this experience was not only outrageously fun, it bonded our team in many remarkable ways. Conversation came easily as we shared in those early experiences, which set the tone for the rest of the summer. Even though we only worked together for three months, the six of us remain close friends to this day, years later.

For most of us, great people and a shared purpose are consistent characteristics of all of our favorite, most memorable jobs—not just as teenagers but as we move into the corporate world, too. So why do we seem to forget this, instead focusing on things like pay, perks, location, etc. (also important factors, to be sure, but best when balanced with people and purpose)?

Keep reading for more tips on how to rally new hires around your company's great people and shared purpose.

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Featured Image Company Culture

Greenhouse’s Secret Ingredient to Building a Thriving Company Culture

Melanie Oberman

Melanie Oberman is the Director of Employee Experience at Greenhouse. She has a passion for making people and culture a strategic driver of the business, allowing employees to do the best work of their career. Her team focuses on scaling the culture in addition to day-to-day operations, office management, talent management, internal communication, and collaboration. We work to make it easy and fun for every employee to fully contribute and engage in the Greenhouse community.


And, she’s proud to say it's working—we were named #1 Best Place to Work by Glassdoor.


Before Greenhouse, Melanie advised senior executives at a variety of media, tech, and telecommunications companies on diversity & inclusion, communication, talent, and training strategies.


You can find Melanie on Twitter and LinkedIn.

In the last couple of years, we’ve grown to approximately 200 people across two offices. With that growth came the need to evolve to be more deliberate about our culture. After a bit of trial and error, we’ve found that the culture committee is one of the best ways to foster the culture we’re trying to create.

Some might be surprised to learn that a committee is the answer; many companies are working toward having fewer meetings, not more. What makes Greenhouse’s culture committee special is that it is truly democratic—the more we can hear from a variety of employees, the more our culture thrives. These ideas, along with our bi-annual engagement survey, pulse surveys, and informal conversations, all help us to inform priorities and initiatives across the organization.

Greenhouse’s culture committee is made up of about 12 employees nominated by their department leadership. Members are all high performers in their day to day jobs and consistently make meaningful contributions to our culture—from planning a team camping trip or office ping pong tournaments to coming up with creative ways to boost morale.

In this post, I will outline what exactly the culture committee does, why it’s become a vital part of our culture, and what we’ve learned along the way.

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Why Should Companies Prioritize Diversity?

Janel Martinez

Janel Martinez is the co-founder and Chief Content Officer at 2020Shift, a startup invested in teaching diverse professionals the skills needed to find a career they love in technology. Her career in journalism, which includes bylines from NBC, Univision Communications, and Black Enterprise, among others, led her to her passion: entrepreneurship. She graduated from Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. Connect with Janel on Twitter and LinkedIn.

In the last few years, there’s been no shortage of headlines, employee reports, and Medium posts tackling diversity and inclusion. We all know diversity can no longer be an afterthought. And while it is the “right thing to do,” it’s essential to the growth and prosperity of your company.

Truly forward-thinking, innovative companies are those that prioritize diversity efforts, ensuring that everyone—from the CEO to each and every employee—not only understands the importance of diversity and how it benefits their organization, but advocates for it.

Data indicates that diversity drives innovation and results in better performance among teams and, ultimately, a higher success rate for companies. 2020Shift has partnered with Greenhouse to create an eBook, “4 Methods to Build A Diverse Team,” to outline how you can build a diverse organization. We know it’s not easy and there’s no one-size-fits-all solution, but our guide can help you on your journey to creating a diverse and inclusive organization.

If you’re on the fence about prioritizing diversity or need help on where to start, we’ve got you covered! Planning out your diversity efforts can seem complicated, but here are four reasons you should prioritize diversity and strategies for getting started now.

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How to Add Skip-Level One-on-Ones to Your Management Toolbox

Michael Boufford

Michael Boufford is the VP of Engineering at Greenhouse. He was the first employee/engineer at the company and currently the head of all engineering teams including Product, Customer Solutions, Infrastructure, Automation & QA, Data Science, Security, and IT. He's a regular speaker/panelist at conferences and events including NASDAQ CTO Summit, Wharton Entrepreneurship Conference, and SiriusXM Business Radio.

The problem

As a manager of managers, it is hard to get enough visibility into your direct reports' organizations to provide specific and actionable feedback.

The solution

In my experience, the most useful forum for finding out the “why” and “how” behind what managers are doing has been via skip-level one-on-ones. I have nearly 60 engineers on my team, but I still make sure to find time to meet with each person at least once per quarter. There are a number of benefits to doing this, but in this article I'm going to focus on one angle: finding out what's going on inside of each manager's team so I can offer specific and actionable feedback on how to improve.

What does a skip-level one-on-one look like—and how can you implement them without freaking out your managers? Read on to find out...

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3 Ways to Create Lasting Relationships with Employee Alumni

Melissa Suzuno

Melissa Suzuno is the Content Marketing Manager at Greenhouse, where she gets to share her love of the written word and endorse the use of the Oxford comma on a daily basis. Before joining Greenhouse, Melissa built out the content marketing programs at Parklet (an onboarding and employee experience solution) and AfterCollege (a job search resource for recent grads), so she's made it a bit of a habit to help people get excited about and invested in their work. Find Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn.

In this series, we’ve been covering how to handle employee departures in a thoughtful and comprehensive way. Check out our previous posts to learn about the problems that arise when ignoring employee departuresthe benefits of investing in offboarding, and how to handle compliance issues for both voluntary and involuntary departures. Or, if you’d like to get all this content (and more!) in one place, be sure to download your copy of the Employee Departure Best Practices eBook.

It’s a fact of the modern-day workforce: Most employees won’t stay with your company forever. But this doesn’t mean that an employee’s last day has to be their last interaction with you. Your organization’s alumni may grow to be your future clients, applicant referrers, and even boomerang employees. But this type of continuing support and engagement will only work if you take the time to maintain your company’s relationship with this group. Here are a few suggestions for staying in touch with former employees.

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(Not) Breaking the Law: Ensuring Compliance During Offboarding

Melissa Suzuno

Melissa Suzuno is the Content Marketing Manager at Greenhouse, where she gets to share her love of the written word and endorse the use of the Oxford comma on a daily basis. Before joining Greenhouse, Melissa built out the content marketing programs at Parklet (an onboarding and employee experience solution) and AfterCollege (a job search resource for recent grads), so she's made it a bit of a habit to help people get excited about and invested in their work. Find Melissa on Twitter and LinkedIn.

There are a number of things to consider when employees leave your company. How you’ll communicate this information to their team and other coworkers. Who will take over their responsibilities. Whether you’ll be organizing a farewell happy hour, and if so, whether Joe will use the opportunity to practice his awkward stand-up routine.

All jokes aside, in this post, we'll look at some of the compliance issues to keep in mind whenever an employee leaves your company. 

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